Glossary

Auto and Homeowner's Insurance Glossary

Definitions offered in this section are meant to provide generic insurance information to consumers. They are not complete descriptions of all terms, exclusions and conditions applicable to the products and services offered by Electric Insurance. The terms and conditions of the policies issued are controlling in all cases. Product availability varies by state.

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Accident
A collision of a vehicle with any object, for example, another vehicle, a fence or tree.
Accidental Death Benefit
A death benefit pays if bodily injury causes the death of you or any family member within 24 months from the date of a covered accident.
Additional Living Expense
Fire or other damage caused by a covered loss could increase your living costs-you may be paying for a hotel, restaurant meals or laundromat, for example. In a standard homeowner's policy, Loss of Use (Coverage D) will reimburse you for any additional living expenses incurred by you in an attempt to maintain a normal standard of living if your home is made uninhabitable by a covered peril, subject to approval. See Loss of Use.
All Risk
An "All Risk" policy insures against any and all losses that can happen to your home, except those that are specifically excluded. However, the policy will state that flood and earthquake are not covered and require a separate endorsement.
Anti-theft Devices
A device that deters a vehicle from being stolen, for example, a car alarm or a special key for the ignition. Cars with hood locks and ignition alarms can save up to 15% comprehensive premiums.
Appurtenant Structure
Detached buildings on the same premises as the main, insured building. Appurtenant structures such as garages or barns on your property are usually covered by your homeowner's insurance policy.
Arbitration Clause
Policy provision that provides a means for settlement when you and your insurer cannot agree on an acceptable claim payment. A representative of each party makes their case to a neutral arbitrator. The arbitrator makes a final, binding decision after hearing all of the facts presented.
At Fault Accidents
A driver presumed to be more than 50% responsible for an accident is considered to be "at fault" and his/her insurance premium is adjusted accordingly. In accident cases where a driver is "cited" by the police, that driver is automatically presumed to be "at-fault".
Auto Policy Discounts
You could pay a lower premium on your auto insurance policy if you qualify for any of several discounts offered Electric Insurance. Scroll to find the definitions for Anti-theft Device, Driver Training, Defensive Driver, Good Student, Multi-Car, and Safe Driver Discounts.

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Basic Reparations Benefit
An optional coverage that covers you, the members of your household and your passengers for medical expenses, rehabilitation services, lost wages and funeral expenses caused by auto accidents. Coverage and availability varies by state and is not available in all states.
Bodily Injury (BI)
Bodily harm, sickness, or disease sustained by any person as a result of an accident. Includes required care and loss of services, as well as any costs associated with resulting death.
Bodily Injury Liability
Pays damages awarded if you are held legally responsible for injury or death caused by a vehicle driven by you or by a covered family member. Single Limit Liability and Split Limit Liability.
Broad Theft Coverage
An endorsement to a Dwelling Policy that provides theft coverage for contents of a named insured, owner occupant.
Business Personal Property
Refers to items or contents owned by your business or company. For example, a laptop you might bring home over the weekend. Coverage is usually limited to $2,350.

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Collision Coverage
Covers the physical damage done to your car because of a collision with another vehicle or object, regardless of who is at fault. Collision does not cover bodily injury or property damage liability — it protects your vehicle only, and is usually subject to a deductible.
Comprehensive Coverage
Sometimes called "Other than Collision," Comprehensive Coverage pays for damages resulting from fire, theft, vandalism, falling objects, hailstorms, floods, and various other perils. For example, hitting a deer can cause a lot of damage to your car-comprehensive takes care of it. Loss of auto glass or windshield is also covered under Comprehensive.
Comprehensive Loss
Any damage done to a vehicle that is caused by something other than a collision. This includes damage to the vehicle by theft, vandalism, fire and flood. Glass loss is a comprehensive loss.
Coverage A
Called "Dwelling", this is the part of your homeowner's insurance policy that covers the home itself-frame, flooring and fixed objects. The amount of Coverage A should represent the cost to replace the structure of your home in the event of total loss. Other coverages are usually based on a percentage of Coverage A.
Coverage B
This part of your policy covers "Other Structures"-barns, sheds, garages. Coverage B is usually 10% of Coverage A (Dwelling Coverage) but can be increased.
Coverage C
"Personal Property" covers your belongings automatically for 50% of Coverage A.
Coverage D
"Loss of Use" takes into account expenses you'll have if your home is uninhabitable because of a covered loss. It pays for temporary lodging and living expenses. Coverage D is usually 20% of Coverage A (Dwelling Coverage). See also Additional Living Expense
Coverage E
"Personal Liability" covers you for your legal responsibility for injury caused to others whether on or away from your own property. The standard limit is $100,000.
Coverage F
"Medical Payments" pays medical costs if someone is injured on your property. A homeowner's policy automatically covers $1,000. You can increase this coverage in $1,000 increments, up to $5,000. In order to collect more than this, the injured party must file for compensation under Coverage E.

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Debris Removal Clause
While most property policies cover only direct damages caused by an insured peril, the "debris removal clause" covers the cost of removing debris produced by the peril's occurrence. For example, a hurricane sweeps through the state; a fallen tree will be removed only if it lands on your house. Debris Removal reimburses you for the cost of cleaning up all the broken limbs and rubble.
Declarations Page
The declarations page tells you who and/or what is covered by the insurance, the amount of coverage purchased and the conditions-the "when" and "where"-covered by the purchased insurance.
Deductible
This is the amount you agree to pay out of your own pocket before the insurance company reimburses you for damage expenses. If you had an accident with damages totaling $1,700, and carry a $350 deductible on your collision coverage, you would pay the first $350, and the insurance company would cover the difference, the remaining $1,350. Raising the amount of your deductible saves you money on the cost of your insurance.
Defensive Driver Discount
In some states, individuals who successfully complete an authorized defensive driver course are eligible for further credits.
Direct Loss
This is damage or a loss resulting as a direct consequence of an insured peril. For example, a computer lost in a fire is a direct loss; the data destroyed inside the computer is considered an indirect loss.
Direct Writer
An insurance company that offers its policies directly to consumers through its own employees is called a "direct writer." Electric Insurance is a direct writer.
Driver Training Discount
Safety is the first rule of the road. To encourage good driving habits in young people, drivers under 21 who complete a driver-training course can often save up to 15% on their insurance premiums. Discounts vary by state and are typically good for 2-3 years.
Dwelling Forms
These are policies that cover a residence dwelling or building, usually not owner-occupied, and the personal property inside. You can buy dwelling forms that vary by the degree of coverage they offer.
DUI
Driving Under the Influence.
DWI
Driving While Intoxicated.

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Earthquake Endorsement
Most homeowner's policies exclude coverage for earthquake damage. People who are concerned about the risk of earthquakes can add an Earthquake Endorsement to cover damages.
Easement
An "easement" entitles its holder to specific interests, such as a right of way, in land owned by someone else.

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FAIR PLAN
An acronym for "Fair Access to Insurance Requirements," FAIR offers insurance to people in high-risk areas who might otherwise be denied coverage. Reinsured by the United States government, FAIR is a pooling plan providing policies for fire and allied perils.
Fair Rental Value
This coverage pays for the rent the building could have earned, less any discontinued expenses, while the premises is not fit for occupancy. Refer to Coverage D under your homeowner's or dwelling policy for more information.
Financial Responsibility Clause
In your insurance agreement, the financial responsibility clause shows that your policy conforms to state financial responsibility requirements.
Financial Responsibility Required
Drivers in most states are required by law to demonstrate their ability to pay for bodily injury or property damage for which they are responsible. In most cases, this "financial responsibility" is fulfilled by purchasing insurance with limits of liability equal to or greater than the amounts required by the state. In some states, you must carry proof of financial responsibility, in the form of an insurance policy, before you can register a vehicle.
Fire
In property insurance, "fire" refers to the unintentional or "hostile" occurrences of flame and combustion. Damage caused by fire in your fireplace, for instance, is not covered under your homeowner's policy. But if your rug were ignited by a spark from that same fireplace, you would be covered.
Fire Resistive Construction
Building construction using fire-resistive materials in its roof, floors and exterior walls. See also Modified Fire-Resistive Construction.
Fire Wall
A wall designed to contain or seal off fires in a building.
Fireproof
Unfortunately, no one can make a building completely impervious to fire. Today, insurers use the term "fire-resistive" to describe buildings that are practically resistant to most fire damage.
Flood
A temporary submersion, partial or complete, of ordinarily dry land by water or mud. Floods are typically caused by an overflow of waters, whether inland, tidal or from any accumulated runoff from any source. Flood is excluded under a typical homeowner's insurance policy.
Flood
Insurance Policies sold to cover property owners from losses caused by floods or flooding, usually offered in conjunction with a government flood insurance plan and reinsured by the federal government.
Frame Construction
The most common form of housing construction, frame buildings are made primarily of wood frames and joists.
Full / Limited Tort Threshold Options
Limited Tort, if selected, applies to the named insured and other household members. The tort threshold determines when an insured may sue for damages. While Full Tort, if selected, does not put a limitation on when an insured may sue for damages.
Funeral Expenses
Funeral or burial expenses actually incurred if "bodily injury" causes an "insured's" death within 24 months from the date of a covered accident.

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Garaging Location
When is a garage not a garage? In this case, it refers to where you usually keep your car when you're not driving it, whether in a building or not. If you normally keep your vehicle in a town other than the one you live in, you must notify your insurance company.
Good Student Discount
Since studies have proven a link between good grades and good, safe driving, some insurance companies offer reduced premiums to students with high scholastic ratings. To be eligible for reduced premiums, simply provide Electric Insurance with a recent transcript showing a B average or better. Good Student discount regulations vary among states and the discount is not available in all states.
Group Affiliation
Electric Insurance is able to offer group discounts to certain companies, groups, or clubs.
Guaranteed Replacement Cost
Guaranteed Replacement Cost coverage on homeowner's insurance means that your home will be repaired to its value at the time of loss, regardless of the amount of coverage carried. For example, you estimate your home to have a full replacement value of $162,000 and you insure it for $162,000. If you have guaranteed replacement cost endorsement on your policy and the home is lost in a fire and the house costs $168,000 to rebuild, the policy will pay $168,000.

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HO3 Policy
One of the most common types of homeowner policies, an HO3 is a Special Form policy that covers all perils except those specifically excluded by the policy. Typical coverages in a HO3 might be: Coverage A - $100,00; Coverage B - $10,000; Coverage C - $50,000; Coverage D - $20,000; Coverage E - at least $100,000; and Coverage F - at least $1,000.
HO4 Policy
Also called a Renters or Tenants Policy, an HO4 provides coverage on your personal property for a range of perils specifically named in the policy. Typical coverages in a HO4 might be: Coverage C - $15,000 and up; Coverage D - $3,000; Coverage E - at least $100,000; and Coverage F - at least $1,000.
HO6 Policy
Condominium insurance is like HO4 (Renters) except that it takes into account the fact that you own the inner walls of your condo or townhouse. It can also fill in any gaps in your condo association's coverage. Typical coverages in a HO6 might be: Coverage A - starts at $1,000; Coverage C - $15,000 and up; Coverage D - $3,000; Coverage E - at least $100,000; and Coverage F - at least $1,000.
Homeowner's Policy
Combined property and liability insurance that covers homeowners and renters for damage to or theft of their property and liability, in case they are responsible for injury to another person.
Homeowners Plus
Homeowners Plus is an endorsement that may be added to your policy if you meet certain eligibility requirements. The endorsement provides the following benefits over the Standard Homeowners policy:
  • Guaranteed Replacement Cost on the dwelling (Coverage A). In the event of a covered loss to the dwelling, we will pay up to the full cost of replacement regardless of the amount of insurance listed on the policy for Coverage A Dwelling (certain provisions apply).
  • Replacement Cost protection on personal property (Coverage C). Recovery for damage or loss to personal property will be adjusted on the value of the replacement cost for each item, with no deduction for depreciation, provided the damaged property is replaced.
  • Increased amounts of coverage on the Special Limits under personal property (Coverage C).

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Increased Cost of Construction Insurance
Commonly added as an endorsement to homeowner's policies, "increased cost of construction insurance" covers the additional costs of building repair or reconstruction when you rebuild with more expensive services, materials and techniques required by local ordinances.
Increased Hazard
Property insurance terms are tailored to the nature and use of the property as it exists when the policy is written. Should you introduce dangerous materials or activities into the property, like making fireworks, you will have added an increased hazard whose liabilities would not be covered by your policy.
Indirect Loss
Also known as consequential loss or damage, indirect loss results from, but is not caused directly by, a peril. If your business property burned down, for instance, the property itself is a direct loss, while the lost business revenues would be considered an indirect loss.
Inflation Guard Coverage
"Inflation Guard Coverage" provides automatic periodic increases on the building's property insurance, to reflect the effects of inflation on building replacement expenses.
Inherent Vice
A property flaw or fault which causes its own destruction. Damages from inherent vices are usually not covered through insurance.

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Liberalization Clause
If policies or endorsement forms are broadened through legislation or rating authority rulings-and do not require premium increases-the "liberalization clause" automatically includes the broadened coverage in similar, existing policies.
Limit of Liability
The ceiling set on the amount an insurer will pay for a loss. See Single Limit Liability and Split Limit Liability.
Livery Use
This is use of a vehicle to carry passengers for a fee, as in a taxicab or a rented limousine. Unless specified in your policy, livery use is not covered by your auto insurance. Carpooling is not considered livery use.
Loss of Use Coverage
If your home becomes uninhabitable because of an insured peril, Loss of Use (Coverage D) provides compensation for additional living expenses incurred in an attempt to maintain a normal standard of living. Loss of Use is automatically included as 20% of the Replacement Cost amount you carry in Coverage A. If your home were covered for $200,000, for example, Loss of Use coverage would provide up to $40,000 for additional living expenses. See Additional Living Expenses.
Loss Payable Clause
To protect lenders or lienholders, this clause extends coverage to parties with an insurable interest in your property, most often the institution holding your mortgage.

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Masonry Noncombustible Construction
Refers to buildings constructed from noncombustible materials such as masonry walls of brick, cinder block, stone, tile, or other similar materials, and floors and roofs made of metal or other noncombustible materials.
Medical Payments / Personal Injury Protection
Covers you, the members of your household and your passengers for medical and funeral expenses resulting from an auto accident, regardless of who is at fault. Personal Injury Protection is not applicable in all states.
Mobile Home Policy
A homeowner's policy for a permanently situated mobile home.
Modified Fire-Resistive Construction
Building construction featuring exterior walls, floors and roofs made of fire-resistive materials such as masonry or metal.
Mortgage Clause
In policies covering mortgaged property, the "mortgage clause" protects the interests of the mortgagee for loss reimbursement and other rights of recovery, regardless of any acts or neglect by the insured.
Mortgagee
A lender or creditor, typically a bank, who holds the mortgage, and lends money secured by the value of the mortgaged property.
Mortgagor
Usually the homeowner who, as debtor, receives money in return for a property mortgage granted as a security for the loan.
Motor Vehicle Record (MVR)
Your state's record of your auto accidents and/or traffic violations. Your insurance rates are based on, among other factors, the quality of your driving history-a good record can mean lower rates! When you accept a policy with Electric Insurance, for example, Electric Insurance uses your driver's license number to review your MVR for claims, losses and violations you may have had in the past five years.
Multi-Car Discount
If you have more than one car insured with Electric Insurance, you probably qualify for a 20% discount (available in most states)!

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Named Perils
Named Perils Insurance covers specific perils listed in a policy, as opposed to a Special Form Policy (such as an HO3) that covers all perils except the ones excluded by name in the policy.
National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP)
A program reinsured by the United States government to provide flood insurance for fixed property. The NFIP writes policies directly and offers reimbursement to private carriers offering flood insurance.
No Fault
See PIP (Personal Injury Protection)

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Occupancy
Property insurance rates reflect the way the property is used. In general, "owner occupied" homeowner's policies are less expensive than "non-owner occupied" policies.
Off Premises
Coverage you can obtain for personal property or "contents" which are away from the principle insured property. In most cases, the amount of this coverage is limited to a percentage of the property's total coverage.
Other Structures
Generally detached structures, such as a garage or tool shed, sharing property with the insured dwelling. Under a homeowner's policy, "other structures" are automatically covered for 10% of the limit chosen for Coverage A.
Other than Collision
See Comprehensive Coverage.
Ownership
The Personal Auto Policy covers cars owned by an individual, or a husband and wife residing in the same household. These requirements exclude coverage for cars owned by businesses or groups of people.

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Personal Injury Protection Deductible
Deductible Under your Personal Injury Protection (PIP) coverage, you may have the option of choosing a deductible or co-payment amount. These are amounts that you would pay out of pocket (in exchange for a reduced premium) before you were entitled to any recovery payment under your PIP coverage. These options are not available in all states.
Personal Injury Protection (PIP)
Waiver of Work Loss Under the Personal Injury Protection coverage, selecting Waiver of Work Loss will eliminate coverage for any work loss due to the covered accident. You may waive the Work Loss coverage only if you and your resident spouse (if applicable) have not received any earned income from wages during the thirty-one days prior to your policy's effective date and none is expected in the next one hundred eight days. (This waiver applies only to the named insured and resident spouse. All other covered persons will be entitled to basic PIP benefits for Work Loss). This option does not apply to all states with Personal Injury Protection coverage options.
Personal Property
Any of your property, such as furniture, clothing and consumer electronics, other than real estate property. Your homeowner's policy covers the personal property of you and any resident family members.
Physical Damage
Actual damage to your property.
Property Damage
Damage to the property of others, including loss of use, caused by your car or another person's car driven by you or a family member.

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Rental Reimbursement
An accident shouldn't leave you stranded without transportation. Rental Reimbursement coverage helps pay for the cost of a rental vehicle while yours is being repaired. In most states, coverage options range from $20/day up to $50/day. This coverage is optional. When you carry physical damage coverage for theft, you may be entitled to reimbursement of rental expenses if your car is stolen even if you don't carry Rental Reimbursement Coverage. Also called Transportation Expense Coverage or Substitute Transportation.
Rental Value
Insurance protection against loss of rental value or actual rent should the owner's insured property suffer damages prohibiting property use or tenant occupation.
Renters Insurance
See HO4 policy.
Replacement Cost
Coverage for the cost of replacing damaged property at the time of loss with that of similar kind and quality. If you carry replacement cost coverage and have a loss, the insurer pays for the cost of a new replacement, minus any policy deductible.
Residence Premises
Where you, the insured, live. In homeowner's insurance, this includes the dwelling, grounds and other structures, or that part of any other building in which you live.

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Safe Driver Insurance Plan
To encourage safe driving-and penalize unsafe drivers-most states assign "points" to traffic violations and certain accidents. Each point adds a percentage surcharge to your insurance policy. Specific surcharge guidelines vary by state.
Scheduled Personal Property
Personal belongings that are worth more than the limits of liability set in your policy, such as jewelry, furs, silverware, etc., can be insured by adding this special endorsement.
Single Limit Liability
Insurance policies covering both bodily injury and property damage can be limited in two ways. A single limit liability has one limit for both injury and property damage combined. For example, if a policy had a $60,000 liability limit, the maximum amount the policy would pay for the total injury and property damage would be $60,000.
Sinkhole Collapse
A special form of earth movement, covered by some homeowner's insurance, referring to the sudden collapse or sinking of land into empty, underground spaces eroded by water.
Split Limit Liability
A split limit liability policy has separate limits per person and per accident for bodily injury, and a per accident limit for property damage.
Stacked / Non-Stacked Uninsured / Underinsured Motorist
When Stacked Uninsured/Underinsured coverage is selected, the limits of coverage available for Uninsured Motorists Coverage are the sum of limits for each motor vehicle insured under the policy. For Non-Stacked Uninsured/Underinsured coverage, the maximum limit of liability for each covered accident is the limit of liability shown in the Declarations Page, regardless of the number of vehicles or premiums shown in the Declarations Page.
Standard / Conversion Underinsured Motorist
Standard Underinsured Coverage (UIM) coverage is usually reduced by amounts paid by workers' compensation, or by or on behalf of the person at fault. Conversion Underinsured Motorist (UIMC) is not reduced by payments from any source. Both Standard (UIM) and Conversion (UIMC) coverages only become available after the liability insurance of the at-fault person has been fully paid. Not available in all states.
Stated Amount
In your policy, you may choose to cover certain items for a specific amount. In the event of loss, the insurer pays the stated amount regardless of the property's actual value. If, for example, you insured a painting for a stated amount of $15,000, in the event of theft you would recover the $15,000 (minus your deductible), even if the painting had accrued value after the policy had been signed.
Substitute Transportation
An accident shouldn't leave you stranded without transportation. Substitute Transportation coverage helps pay for the cost of a rental vehicle while yours is being repaired. In most states, coverage options range from $20/day up to $50/day. This coverage is optional. When you carry physical damage coverage for theft, you may be entitled to reimbursement of substitute transportation expenses if your car is stolen, even if you don't carry Substitute Transportation Coverage. Also called Transportation Expense Coverage or Rental Reimbursement.

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Tenants Policy
Another term for Renters Insurance. See HO4 policy.
Towing
For more peace of mind when you're on the road, many policies include coverage for towing and/or repair at point of breakdown. This is an optional coverage-call and add it to your policy. You'll be surprised how inexpensive this convenience can be!
Transportation Expense
An accident shouldn't leave you stranded without transportation. Transportation Expense coverage helps pay for the cost of a rental vehicle while yours is being repaired. In most states, coverage options range from $20/day up to $50/day. This coverage is optional. When you carry physical damage coverage for theft, you may be entitled to reimbursement of transportation expenses if your car is stolen, even if you don't carry Transportation Expense Coverage. Also called Substitute Transportation or Rental Reimbursement.
Type of Vehicle
The terms of your insurance policy vary with the type of vehicle you wish to cover. In order to qualify for Personal Auto Coverage, for example, your vehicle must be a private passenger auto or a motor vehicle considered to be a private passenger auto. (A "private passenger auto" is defined as a four-wheel motor vehicle, other than a truck, owned or leased for at least six continuous months.) Pickups and vans may be considered private passenger autos under the following conditions: they must have a gross vehicle weight (GVW) of less than 10,000 pounds and must not be used for the delivery or transportation of goods or materials, unless such use is incidental to an insured's business of installing, maintaining or repairing equipment, or such use is for farming or ranching.

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Underinsured Motorist Property Damage (UIMPD)
Underinsured Motorist Property Damage Coverage provides coverage when property damage is sustained by an insured and the negligent operator possesses insurance, but the limits of liability carried by the negligent driver are not sufficient to cover the damages.
Underinsured Motorist (UIM)
Insurance provisions for the "underinsured motorist" cover you, the insured members of your household and your passengers for injuries, damages or death caused by the negligence of a person with insufficient insurance. Should you have a valid claim against a person whose coverage cannot meet your damages, your policy will meet the difference-up to the limit of liability listed on your policy.
Uninsured Motorist Property Damage Deductible
Uninsured Motorist Property Damage coverage may be subject to a deductible at the option of the insured. This option may not be available in all states.
Uninsured Motorist (UM)
In your policy, the "uninsured motorist" provision covers you, the insured members of your household and your passengers for bodily/personal injuries, damages or death caused by an at-fault uninsured or hit-and-run driver. For example, if you are involved in an accident where the other driver is at fault but has no insurance, your policy will cover your medical expenses, up to the limit on your policy.
Uninsured Property Damage (UMPD)
Property Damage Uninsured Motorists Coverage provides coverage for your auto when property damage is sustained by an insured and the negligent operator does not possess insurance.
Unoccupied
Property without people occupying or living within it. As opposed to vacant property, unoccupied property may hold furnishings. Unoccupancy beyond a specified period of time is prohibited by the standard homeowner's policy.

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Vacant
A building with nothing in it. While an "unoccupied" building is defined by not having people in it, a "vacant" building is also devoid of furnishings and other items. Vacancy beyond a specified period of time is prohibited by the standard homeowner's policy.
Vandalism and Malicious Mischief
Your homeowner's policy automatically covers you for willful destruction or damage performed by others to your property.
VIN (Vehicle Identification Number)
This is a 17-character number that is unique to each vehicle and identifies characteristics of the vehicle such as year, make, model and engine specifics. The VIN is usually located on the driver's side of the dashboard.
Violation(s)
Any driving offense for which you are issued a ticket. (Does not include parking tickets.) When applying for insurance, you must disclose all violations received within the specified time frame. The completion of safe or defensive driving courses does not negate the fact that a ticket was received.

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Window Etching
Window Etching is a vehicle identification system in which letters, numbers, or the Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) is etched into the vehicle. Specific states have specific requirements. Please contact an Electric Insurance account specialist for additional information. The Electric Insurance FAQ section can answer commonly asked questions. Definitions offered in this section are meant to provide generic insurance information to consumers. They are not complete descriptions of all terms, exclusions and conditions applicable to the products and services offered by Electric Insurance. The terms and conditions of the policies issued are controlling in all cases. Product availability varies by state.

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